Road Experiments in Singapore


I have been observing driver behaviour on Singapore roads for the past several months, and decided to conduct an experiment recently.

For the uninitiated, Singapore traffic system looks to be the most advanced system of its kind in the world, with orderly traffic and less congestion than what should exist in a densely populated city state of over 5.5M people and nearly a million cars (not yet verified). Singapore has over 3,500 KMs of paved road (must have gone up by now – my data is couple of years old) in a small island with an area of 700 SQ KM.

However, the orderliness for which Singapore is famed over the years has come down in recent years – traffic incidents are on the increase, rash driving is common, and simple violations are going up on the roads. I see this every day while driving to office and back.

Of course, compared to other large and even small nations, Singapore scores on multiple factors, such as accidents per capita, traffic deaths per capita, etc., It is still a well-managed traffic system, with controls and monitoring in place to ensure appropriate driver behaviour.

However, I decided to check this out. Most days, I take the innermost (high-speed) lane on the expressways (I am avoiding mention of the specific expressway here), and maintain more or less a constant speed of 90 KMPH. I noticed that many drivers did not like me as their conclusion appeared to be that I was too slow on a high-speed lane though the displayed speed limit at most places on the highway was 80 KMPH and in sections of the highway it was 90 KMPH. The daily occurrence was that high-speed cars acted as though they were chasing James Bond on the expressway, and zoomed in behind me at speeds in excess of 100 – 120 KMPH and gave me the scare. After seeing that I was not going to dodge them by shifting to the next lane, they eventually overtook me and occasionally looked at me while doing so. But the most scary part was when they are behind my car at probably couple of feet away at very high speeds, when the advised distance between two cars is six car lengths at speeds of 60 KMPH. I do keep at least a gap of 3 to 4 car lengths between my car and the car ahead of me, even in the innermost high-speed lane, irrespective of pressures exerted at my back by drivers who were fast losing patience with my cautious driving and wondering why I was driving on this lane anyway.

My conclusion was that if one sticks to the speed limit imposed on expressways, he or she is bound to get into problems if he or she chooses to follow that speed limit on the innermost high-speed lane. He or she will be hated for following the traffic rules, and will be cursed for blocking high-speed cars.

Now I decided to check out the middle lane which is supposed to be for slightly slower cars. One thing that I noticed is that my overall time taken to reach the office was more or less the same – though my speed was averaging at 70 KMPH, as compared to the high-speed lane in which my average speed was in excess of 80 KMPH. Second thing I noticed was that my slower speed was respected by most motorists, who decided to overtake me without much issues, either from the left or from the right. They must have just come to the conclusion that there is no point in arguing with a guy who has decided that the world will indeed move slowly today. Luckily, there was no threatening and over-speeding cars behind me in the middle lane – in fact, there was no such cars occupying the middle lane. The reason for that could be simple – the fast riders move very fast from their starting or entry point to the innermost lane and then push ahead with speeds higher than what is stipulated by the authorities.

I found that the middle lane offered most comfort at less cost. Petrol consumption was lower, and driving was more relaxed. While one has to be cautious all the time, there was no reason to be scared in the middle lane. Of course, the irritant of the high-speed, maneuvering motor cycles (mostly from Malaysia) cannot be avoided, and one has to be wary of them as they weave in and out of lanes all the time. The Singaporean motorcycles also violate all the road rules, and it is tougher for them as they usually have bigger motorcycles or scooters with bulges on both sides, etc., Even they try to sneak between the lanes which is a dangerous game.

In a nutshell, my experiment revealed that driving has become a tad dangerous on Singapore expressways and even on the regular city roads because motorists drive at high speeds and cut across in front of you without warning. Or tailgate good drivers who are following the traffic rules. And so on and so forth.

Traffic education should be mandatory before renewal of driving licence to all motorists irrespective of their past performance. That seems to be the only way to secure improved driver behaviour on the road.

Best Regards

Vijay Srinivasan

11th June 2016

Advertisements

2 comments

  1. Shiva

    Wish toads a few other points frommy observations
    1. No one cares to signal when they chabge lanes especially during the day
    2. When taxis enter the expessway they have a right of way to get to innermost lane at point of entry and have right to exit from inner lane to exit at the point of exit
    3. At traffic signals its okay to finish reading you whats app and reply to emails at least that is what many a motorist do

  2. Hi i was just on your website

    Hello,
    I was just taking a peek at your website,
    it’s a good fit for my new free Ebook. I want to give you an 100% FREE Report showing you how within 10 minutes you can gain more clients and sales via social media
    PLUS access to my blog which is full of pure GOLD! showing you how to get more Traffic, Leads and sales ALL this 100% FREE.
    My blog is full of step by step guides and case studies showing you how to make more money both online and offline, and will give you so many light bulb moments i am sure.
    As i say i am not trying to sell you anything and hope you get a ton of VALUE from the report and my blog ..
    To Your success. .Dean.
    http://www.allhatsmedia.org

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s