New Laptop Procurement Process


For the past 4.5 years, I have been using a Lenovo X230 laptop. I recall the process I went through in selecting the same after my usual exhaustive evaluation, and placing the order just before I was embarking on a trip to the U.S. way back in November 2012. I received the laptop during a training program I was attending at Reno, Nevada in early December 2012.

I still continue to use the same laptop (which is functioning normally) for most of my work. At office, I use a MacBook Air, so I continue to witness the differences between the two operating environments on an ongoing basis. Of course, since our minds speed up due to the world speeding up, everything one possesses seem to be slowing down, and it was not different with the X230 – it appeared to be slow, more because I had cluttered it with lots of useless applications over the years (which I had been doing to all my previous laptops as well, so nothing new here). Sometimes, due to my excessive attention to enhancing the performance or cleaning up the clutter of huge number of trashed files or optimizing the Windows Registry, the Lenovo X230 did not like me. It used to hang, and I had to do a hard reboot (which I do not suggest). Once, I lost a file on which I had done significant work, and I was furious, but could not blame the laptop. I started backing up using the Seagate backup software (with which I struggled a lot before getting it to work properly), and things seemed to be getting fine, with occasional hiccups.

However, my wife wanted a new laptop for herself without my encroachment all the time. Though she had her own Apple MacBook, that was taken by my son on loan and it became his permanent possession. One day, my wife took a strong position on her computing needs and refused to time slice between Lenovo Windows 10 and Apple MacBook. She demanded I get her a new one and did not provide any specifications for the same. I guess she secretly desired an Apple, but I had been consistently under-selling the new range of MacBooks, pointing out battery problems and lack of new processors, etc., I also felt that Apple is not paying enough attention to the MacBook range, instead focusing only on the iPhone. Slowly, I was able to edge her towards Windows 10, with the promise that I will get her the best that is available in the market.

It took me couple of months of intermittent research, but finally I narrowed it down to three choices: Dell, HP and Lenovo. I would be surprised if most shortlists do not have these three names anyway, especially in the Windows world. The Microsoft SurfacePro was also in the running, but I dropped it considering the fact that it was not sturdy enough to be a home laptop. My wife was specific on one thing – she did not want to have a touch screen, and she did not want the funny pyramid or triangle type standing ones.

Lenovo Yoga range and HP’s latest laptop range were indeed sexy with tons of new features. I really liked the Yoga and almost selected a model that fit my specs, but finally chose the Dell. Within the Dell range, I struggled a lot between XPS 13 with rose gold colour and XPS 15. Had XPS 13 been available with 16GB RAM and 512GB SSD, I would have gone for it and saved a few hundred dollars of additional investment, but XPS 13 did not have that combination (at least in the online ordering site of Dell). I was very clear that the new laptop should have the latest Intel Kaby Lake processor, 16GB main memory and 512GB SSD drive. In terms of graphics processors, I preferred the NVidia against Intel’s own. I was fine with 13.3″ screen with no edges (maximum screen real estate) at the minimum and wanted 4K resolution if it was not too expensive. The Dell XPS 15 met all these specs but I downgraded the screen resolution from 4K to 2K as the additional investment was almost USD 400!

I also wanted backlit keyboard and a fingerprint scanner, with all the usual ports. I had to keep raising the budget to meet my expectations, and as always, was surprised that not every “good” feature was available in a laptop that should not cost more than USD 1,200. But, alas, that was not to be. The cheaper laptops (you see these advertised from USD 300 onwards) lack most of these features and surely are not geared to delaying product obsolescence. In electronics, there is no guarantee of not getting obsolete in 12 months time, but I was preparing for something which could stand on its own feet for at least a 2 to 3 year timeframe.

So, I went ahead and specified a 4-year warranty coverage (1 + 3). This substantially increases the cost. As folks who have used Apple would know, the Apple Care protection is not cheap, but it is absolutely a necessary thing – never avoid investing in Apple Care, as repairs are hugely expensive when it comes to maintaining Apple products. Windows laptops from major manufacturers are not far behind from a repair cost perspective, so I decided to invest upfront. I also wanted a laptop which can be purchased in the U.S. (like my own Lenovo) and then transferred over to the country where we live.

So, my wife now has the Dell XPS 15 with a beautiful 15.6″ display and specs which match what I have listed above. It is blazingly fast (of course, since there are hardly any cluttering applications on it – she won’t allow those to be installed anyway), and looks pretty nice, though a bit heavy to carry around. It is an appropriate acquisition for older folks like us with eyesight challenges (wearing glasses, hope she does not read this!!!), with a bigger screen and big font sizes.

I have installed the usual Anti-Virus, Firewall and related software to protect the laptop. I believe this is an excellent choice for the specs I have outlined. I am available for any unpaid consultation for digitally challenged folks who would like to design their home networks and operate a set of devices – not just laptops, but other devices such as Amazon Echo (which I recently installed and will write about soon), and also protect the network from cyber snoopers.

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

9th July 2017

 

 

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