Shoot the Piano Player: Andhadhun


Well, let me get to my movie rating quickly. Andhadhun is a good movie, no doubt about it. It is a murder mystery, and has several murders in it. Sriram Raghavan is a good director given to multiple twists and turns, and keeps the audience guessing as to which way the movie is taking, and throws in a totally unexpected surprise towards the end, and all of that.

While I would give the first half of the movie a 4.5 rating (on a scale of 5), the second half of the movie gets no more than a 3.0. Overall, I would have to give a rating of, let me say, 3.8 – actually, my wife may not agree to this rating, she thought the movie flagged and meandered in the second half, so probably she would give it a 3.5.

“Andhadhun” is a well-directed movie, Mr. Raghavan does a great job. To decipher the movie’s logic, you need to be in his shoes and see what he sees through his characters. It will be challenging, let me assure you, as you are likely to miss certain cues and clues as your mind is racing fast forward to solve the mystery which has been presented to you – and you are acting like a Sherlock Holmes in unraveling the mystery.

While I knew or felt that the piano player would survive all the attempts to murder him by several players, I could not have forecasted the multiple twists that he would be put through before he finally survived! That play by the director was outstanding, in terms of eliminating all the other “bad” characters in an unsuspecting manner towards the end of the movie. However, the movie has an “open” ending, our piano player hero does not choose to connect ultimately with the heroine who has had a crush on him but deserts him when she found out about his false infidelity, perpetrated by the main antagonist who murdered her own husband. So what is the real ending? Our hero kicks the coke can on the street!

It is an unusual plot, and I was not surprised to learn that the director has given credit to a French movie called L’Accordeur (Piano Tuner). French mystery movies are my favourites, and I have seen plenty of them in the past. Concepts such as a twisted murder mystery plagued by suspicions and more murders are best handled by French directors with their dollops of creativity and expert direction.

While I would not reveal the plot details of the movie in this post, suffice it to state that “what you see is not what you get”. You must understand that our piano player hero plays his first role not as a real blind man, but as a simulated blind guy – which means he can actually see what he sees, like all of us. In the next role, the main antagonist blinds him willfully for real, so this time our piano player really becomes blind. His reaction when he finds out that he has totally lost his eyesight is a priceless enactment of his real feelings, as compared to the previous simulations as a pseudo blind guy. It is funny how the audience learns about his fake blindness via the tracking of a small boy who lives in the same housing block as our hero, who becomes suspicious and even goes to the extent of tying his smartphone on a long stick to film the “real” normal hero who is performing the daily chores like a normal person would do!

My view of Bollywood movies still remains the same – “not much substance” in most of the movies coming out. But, Andhadhun is a refreshing change – once in a long while, we do get some real good movies, but let us not forget that these are adaptations of Western movies and their directorial impact. While it is fine to adapt, the fact is that the concept has already been tried and tested out, and our Bollywood director is adapting the storyline to his tastes. I don’t know if I am wrong on this count. I am, however, looking for truly original concepts and storylines like what we sometimes get from Malayalam or Bengali movies with lot of thought about a social mechanism and impact of real-life humanity on a movie’s story.

Nothing wrong with Andhadhun, except for the flailing second half which could have been speeded up, instead of engaging in unnecessary dialogues. The director had total control in the first half of the movie with a crisp plot and amazing execution. He could have carried it through to the second half instead of the convoluted plot which becomes confusing – though it might be deliberate.

You can see Andhadhun on NetFlix now, which is what I did.

Cheers, and have a great week ahead folks,

Vijay Srinivasan

23rd December 2018

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