Rumination of a Non-Musical Mind


I was rarely influenced by music all this while. It is surprising, but it is the way that I have come up with, building a totally non-musical mind. I did not deal with stress by listening to music, but by doing a variety of things almost non-stop, actually not relaxing at all. I have known this for a very long time, but could not shake the well-entrenched habit of rushing from one thing to the next.

Music of the Bollywood type sometimes interested me for the rhythmic tunes and the accompanying dance, but I quickly forgot the songs, sometimes reminded of a specific song when it played on radio. I was just not interested in the non-movie music of any kind. Except…………..

Yes, there are always some exceptions to the way one works.

I was deeply influenced by the story of Karen Carpenter, so I am a fan of “The Carpenters” which was the first album I stored on my iPhone many years ago. I often listen to it while driving and taking a long early morning walk. I also developed a fascination for two other bands which were popular in the Seventies and Eighties: ABBA and BoneyM. These albums also feature on my iPhone, apart from albums of Lionel Ritchie and Michael Jackson. That is it – yes, I have only these few albums in my phone, for reasons which are not that common: influence by the story of the artist or the band, an understanding of the message in some of the songs, etc., Not really because the artist or the band or the album was ground-breaking or major hits in the market.

Of late, I have started using Spotify on my iPhone as my mind turns to the soothing power of a music or song that impacts my mood in a strongly positive manner. It is a rather slow transition for me as I am learning slowly how to relax totally without disrupting the rest of my ecosystem and thinking. I do not wish to be totally dominated by music like how fans sing passionately along with a famous band on stage, appearing to be almost in a trance. It is not that important to me to be able to follow and chase a music icon that I otherwise like or prefer. May be I am not young, may be I am not driven by passion in every walk of life, may be I just do not wish to spend SGD 200 plus for a 1.5 hour concert, so on and so forth.

On Spotify, I found couple of artists that I have started to like: one is Ed Sheeran, and the other is Bryan Adams. There are countless artists, bands and albums, and there is not enough time. I tend to focus on the people I like, instead of throwing a wider net. I also try figuring out what these guys really sing, by downloading the lyrics of at least the songs I like and trying to understand how the English language can be “treated” to sound so much more stylish and what I call “rapidly coalescing” into the listeners’ minds. I also read up on the history of the particular artist or band, and that has always been very interesting.

For example, I went walking for an hour this morning (as I do on 6 out of the 7 days in a week), and thought it will be good to listen to Bryan Adams. It was a good experience – I should say I enjoyed his songs. I had to decode the words in some of the songs, but that is normal for me. Couple of days ago I played Ed Sheeran who was more intense on the emotions. Such comments bring out tough remarks, but to everyone his own, right?

Gradually I am transforming what was a completely non-musical mind into a “slightly more musically” oriented mind. My wife has always been a musically influenced and knowledgeable person with good grasp of Tamil and Sanskrit songs – she had always tried to persuade me to relax with such music. She even suggested that I should try to focus my mind with the sound of “OM” which has a ringing tone which never seems to end. But I have only been curious and experimental, rather than a disciplined executioner when it came to music for a very long time.

Now, I am trying to discipline my mind with the hope that it will be better ordained, relaxed and loosened up with some good music. There are, of course, reasons why music is so popular with most people, apart from pure relaxation. I have seen people truly enjoying soft music for instance, closing their eyes ever so often. I have seen people enjoying blaring music which affects all folks within earshot. And I have seen people who play great music around the house designed to deliver a calming influence on all household folks (and, hopefully reduce conflicts!).

Well for me, the big benefit is the increased ease with which I walk and complete nearly 5 KMs of brisk walk every morning. Music has helped me (though without it, I was anyway walking) to make the experience pleasurable, with the mind focusing more on the song, the artist, the band, the album, and the lyrics rather than the effort of walking with sweat streaming through my shirt. As things get easier to do, one tends to follow the new methodology more closely and in a more effective manner. I have to add here, of course, that my new bluetooth wireless earphones have just been amazing!

So, that has been my limited experience with music.

Have a good weekend, folks,

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

01 June 2019

The “all-screen” Addiction


I am not a TV watcher or movie goer.

I rarely go for movies (on the average once in six months) in a theatre, or watch soap operas. I occasionally see CNN or CNBC or BBC on the home TV, more because I like the anchor or the presenter rather than the content of the news. Most news that I consume is via iPhone apps anyway, so I am more or less current on global affairs anyway.

However, after the advent of NetFlix which I have subscribed to (on behalf of the family of course), there have been some change in my behavioural pattern. I liked a few of the original NetFlix serials and a few movies. Initially, I used to see once per week. Later, it became twice and thrice a week, as I could not resist the urge to know more about the next episode of a particular serial. While movies can be had in one sitting of mostly less than 2 hours, serials can drive you towards serious addiction, as multiple episodes would generally be available for viewing at one go – which means you can sit through some 3 to 4 episodes, each spanning some 45 minutes. And, you are never happy and “complete” as there are many more episodes of the same serial still pending for your viewing and ultimate pleasure.

I must have seen at least 10 serials over the past 6 months or so – some of these are not finished, still continuing and I have not completed the viewing though multiple unviewed episodes are available for my viewing. I have more or less stopped seeing NetFlix movies, as my general rating is not more than 3.0 out of 5.0 for most of the movies. But serials have been good and absorbing, though I felt that several of these were unnecessarily dragging on without closure – similar to the Tamil language TV serials in multiple TV channels in Tamil Nadu (and elsewhere in India).

I think, by now, I have developed an addiction for NetFlix serials. What this means is simple – if I have nothing else to do, I tend toward NetFlix viewing, there seems to be not much else to do. This is wrong, and this is how bad addictions start (all addictions are bad). I have to shake myself off NetFlix, but sometimes I feel that I am paying for it, so I have to at least see some – get some viewing on NetFlix as my “share” of the overall family viewing experience and cost amortization. This is an useless argument, as we all know. Like cigarette or drug use, it is hard to drop TV addiction once you start liking and enjoying it. We do nothing while seeing TV or NetFlix – we are dumbos avidly lapping up the dishes served on the screen. Is this a good thing? No, not at all. I wouldn’t be surprised if clinics/hospitals/ashrams start NetFlix de-addiction programs and charge people a bomb for it, as most folks are getting sucked into NetFlix – especially in countries like India where the pricing is very low. In many countries such as India, Indonesia, Malaysia, China, etc., mobile data consumption has shot up in a huge manner due to video viewing on mobiles by people of all demographics, especially millennials.

I am also addicted to YouTube – I see Stephen Colbert and Seth Myers every morning (my time) on my iPhone, and also see other stand-up comedians like Russell Peters, Rowan Atkinson, Hasan Minhaj, et al………again, I could not resist this simple temptation – after all it is some 30 minutes during my early morning hours. But then, I have created a pattern now which I believe might turn out to be harmful in the long run. Looks like I cannot live without YouTube, NetFlix, WhatsApp, and so many other apps.

On top of all this going on (not just in my case, but for most people I know), my son subscribed to Amazon’s PrimeVideo at the ridiculous price of SGD 2.99 per month – that is INR 150 per month! Much lower than NetFlix price of SGD 13.98 per month. Apart from the equivalent of NetFlix, Amazon Prime has other benefits such as a 2-hour delivery of items ordered, etc., and a free-month of PrimeVideo. I dilly-dallied for some time, but eventually approved the subscription. This means that my addiction problems are now doubled instantaneously. I thought of chucking out NetFlix, but after using PrimeVideo I decided it would be better to keep NetFlix going – as I found it to be a far better option. I still managed to see two movies on PrimeVideo before calling it a day, though my family thinks it is a better option!

Now you see my problem? Dealing with this addiction is going to be a bigger challenge than the usual corporate issues or inter-personal matters. Addiction is slated to be the biggest challenge for most millennials, but I am no millennial. My experience proves that addiction can happen at any age or any time and anywhere. In fact, I pulled out my iPhone on a high-speed train in China recently, connected it to the train WiFi and started seeing NetFlix serials! Come on, not a good way to spend time – you should be doing emails or creating a business plan while on such a nice transportation system. I am thinking constantly of how to go back to pre-NetFlix days when I was not disturbed by the feasibility of such on-demand movies and serials. I think I should. What do you think? Are you having this addiction? How are you dealing with it? Do you think such an addiction is bad? How will our children view us when we are constantly engaged on viewing a movie or serial on a laptop or on mobile phone, or even on the home TV? Feels like those days when TV was dominant…………..and grabbed all the family time.

Let me come up with a de-addiction plan. In the meanwhile, here’s wishing you a wonderful week ahead, folks.

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

17th February 2019


Android TV Box


After some serious investigation, I decided to cut the umbilical cord of entertainment which has defined households for several decades when it comes to TV time.

Yes, I decided to cut my cable TV subscription when the current contract ends. Of course, not the broadband fibre internet connection, that is absolutely needed.

What happened, you might ask. I am asking myself why I kept paying for cable all these years.

High speed broadband internet of the order of 300 MBPS and above became available only some 3 years ago in Singapore. I got my 1 GBPS connectivity around 2 years ago (though it is namesake only, the speed does not come anywhere close to the stated speed of 1 GBPS, though it is fast).

Without such high-speed internet, it would not have been anyway possible to eliminate the cable subscription.

I was surprised with the plethora of options available on streaming internet with an Android TV Box. Not only that, I could even view foreign news channels and sports TV which are not available even with a cable subscription. Thousands of viewing choices become available at your fingertip.

Of course, we do not have time to see even one movie completely at home. I used to just see the top news on CNN and some financial news on CNBC. Nothing much else. I became movie and TV serial friendly only upon the advent of Netflix. Though I would like to maximize my returns from that monthly subscription (which enables the family to see movies and serials on laptops and iPADs), personally I struggled with watching even one full season of a serial. So, time is short when you are looking at the familiar options, and that does not change a wee bit even with the Android TV Box.

However, I took it upon myself the project of cutting cable subscription costs which are quite steep in a tight market like Singapore wherein the competition is rather limited. It became a technical evaluation project, not surprisingly. I am not an Android guy, having been committed to the iPhone for the past over 5 years, so it took some time to figure out things.

It was, however, an exciting investigation. It took me just about couple of weeks to figure out what to do and how to execute, what to buy, etc., I studied a variety of options and eliminated most as local support in Singapore was found lacking. I did not want to just walk into Sim Lim Tower (the consumer electronics hub of Singapore), and pick up any kind of Android TV Box, though my research did produce options which were available there. I decided to go and buy online, which I ultimately did, saving time and effort.

There is a mind-boggling variety of options available to anyone who wants to cut the cable cord and move into streaming media technology. It took me a while to wade through fake claims and determine what are the really good options available.

Finally, I chose the following main features as necessary for the performance I was looking for –

Main Features:
● Combines durable 1.5GHz ARM Cortex – A53 CPU with Amlogic S912 chip
● Android 7.1 version, coupled with the rapid and stable configuration
● 4K / 3D video gives you high-quality video experience
● Dual-band WiFi gives you more smooth speed experience
● Bluetooth 4.1 connectivity. Easy pairing with most Bluetooth-enabled devices
● Support Miracast / DLNA / Airplay, share your video to your TV
● Voice remote control (you would love it)

Specs:
Core: Octa Core
Processor: Amlogic S912
CPU: ARM Cortex-A53
GPU: ARM Mali-T820MP3
Model: M8S PRO L
RAM Type: DDR3 (3 GB min.) ROM: 32 GB min
System: Android 7.1

There are many boxes available meeting the above specification. I bought the MECOOL TV BOX

Like most such boxes, this is also made in China. It has a good reputation and good product reviews. I would like to remind the readers that there are several such products available from several China manufacturers and you better do your own research. I bought the Mecool M8S PRO L 4K TV Box Amlogic S912 Bluetooth 4.1 + HS – VOICE REMOTE CONTROL ( 3GB RAM + 32GB ROM ) model which you can find in Sim Lim Tower or online. This product has a local supplier in Singapore who offers one year warranty which is not usual for these kinds of products.

I had my usual enthusiasm of getting something new after I placed the order online. The box arrived in 3 days and I was surprised it was so small. It is very small, and I could not believe it could pack so much power, yet it is a real high powered cable cord cutter.

I installed the box and ran it for a couple of days, but then I grew tired of the look and feel on my TV screen and wanted to go in for a new build. Again this is a thrilling journey, as you have to erase all the pre-installed content on the box, and take the risk of the box not working after your experimentation.

But it worked for me – I uninstalled all that was there and re-installed it in the way I liked with a KODI build that I preferred. KODI is the entertainment dashboard for the Android TV Box, and there are many builds available on top of KODI to stream media content to your TV box. It took me a couple of days to understand what the geeks around the world are doing, and then I decided to do it my way with NO LIMITS MAGIC BUILD which is one of many types of builds available.

Finally, the TV Box is producing the results I expected, but I have more work to do. It is exciting and it is absorbing – more than the actual media content which has started streaming.

Kill your cable connection and embark on a new journey. Do not download media just stream it to stay within legal limits.

Cheers, and Have a good week ahead,

Vijay Srinivasan

02 September 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

The News Bias


There exists a political bias in almost all news organizations. Most famous ones such as CNN, MSNBC, The New York Times and The Washington Post are considered liberal, which means “leftist” in the U.S. News organizations such as Fox News, The Wall Street Journal and countless others are best characterized as conservative, which means “rightist” in the U.S. There is hardly any neutral news organization or publication anywhere in the world. The closest that I have seen are The Hindu newspaper in India, and The Guardian in the U.K. There may be others that I do not know, and my lack of mentioning others does not mean that there are no other neutral publications or TV news channels.

There is nothing wrong with some bias, as news editors are, after all, human beings, and have certain orientations and thought processes in their heads as they handle news and news analyses. However, they are not supposed to twist or tweak the factual news to their advantage, with an insidious purpose in mind. It could be that they wish to provoke an anti-government or anti-establishment public reaction, which goes against the grain of news gathering and publishing. The editorials could convey what the editor(s) wants to comment on the main news of the day, but the reporting has to be absolutely factual, as otherwise it could turn dangerous, as we have seen recent instances especially in India with fake news (“faked” news) dominating and corrupting the public’s view of the happenings. Such reporting happens in many countries around the world, and is designed to serve the political orientation of the editor or owner of the publication.

It is becoming increasingly clear that there has to be a law to regulate news, much like in the old days when news publications could be prosecuted for incorrect news reporting which results in public mayhem, destruction, deaths, violence, etc., (this used to be called “censorship” in old times). There is nothing wrong in seeking to enforce law and order against what is famously known as the “Fourth Estate”. I am not inclined to believe that a carefully calibrated law and order enforcement against an erring news publication or TV channel or news organization can be termed as shutting down press freedom. Everyone is subject to the same laws, so what is so unique about one segment of the society?

Well, we might need a “news ombudsman” to ensure impartiality, and to enforce actions against all publications without fear or favour. It is easier said than done. Any government appointee is going to be at least slightly biased, and so it is critical to select someone with the involvement of the government of the day, the political opposition in the parliament and the judiciary, and to embed sufficient powers in the office of such an ombudsman, who can issue orders to law enforcement, much like the Election Commissioner, or the Head of Anti-Corruption Agency.

News organizations should also include all social media platforms such as FaceBook, Twitter, Instagram, et al. They need to be regulated simply because they are more powerful than any brick and mortar news producer. News on such platform posted by anyone spreads at exponential speeds and rumours could create havoc. We have also recently witnessed how FaceBook sacrificed the personal data of millions of people who use their platform for monetary benefit. Given the proclivity of the younger generation to take up social media platforms with amazing speed, it becomes essential to moderate such platforms without causing damage to the neurons of youngsters at a very young age.

I enjoy flipping the news channels between CNN, BBC, Fox News, CNBC, and other local / regional channels. The priority given to news coverage varies across the channels. Sometimes what you think is a very important piece of news does not even merit a mention in some of the channels. If things do not go well for the audience of Fox News, then the anchors distract them with some unimportant sidelights. And so on and so forth. Of course, it requires a worldly intelligence to segregate fake news from what is real. It is not an easy skill, as fake news could easily be debunked and thrown away upon a refresh of the news website; it could be worded in a convincing way which reflects in certain measure some amount of truth, or it could be covered by a famous news anchor. If Russia is disliked by most news channels for ideological or political reasons, it is very easy to spot that dislike. If China is berated for trade or intellectual property thefts, that also gets highlighted in a big way. There are hardly any counter arguments that you would hear in the world famous TV news channels against their own governments or allies. It is not unnatural, but it is not normal in a news reporting organization. There are, of course, good examples of news reporting which is balanced and also good analysis of news with differing viewpoints which we get to see sometimes, but such balanced coverage is slowly declining in my opinion, as the audience wants “supportive” analyses, not “destructive” analyses by political commentators. There is also disdain of these commentators or opinion-producers amongst the common public, as they are repeatedly used throughout the year, with more or less the same views. They are either “supportive” of the government, or in some cases “destructive” of the government’s stand on issues. Eventually, people will realize that anyone on this planet can have a view of his/her own on any issue which may or may not affect him/her. Nothing wrong with that position either. The point is that fast-talking commentators have not helped to define a news organization, they only reflect their own biases in their opinion piece.

Looking at the overall stained news scenario, it is but normal to conclude that we should make up our own news – what I mean is that, you pull together pieces of news from various publications using some software which can generate your own news as per your own criteria. If I am a conservative, rightist kind of person, then my filters would produce news that I am looking for! Tomorrow, I could become a liberal and I will then get to enjoy the “liberal” view of world news and happenings!!

Well, folks have a good weekend, and avoid drinking alcohol,

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

14th April 2018 (Today is TAMIL New Year, Wishes to my Tamil Friends and Families!)

The terrible loss of privacy


Privacy is a funny aspect of life.

Most institutions and corporations we deal with in our lives demand that we sign off on dotted lines when it comes to providing them access to our very personal data. Most consumer companies do the same thing. Governments have always asked for our data. However, the phenomenon of giving away our total freedom and personal data to social media giants did not bother us for a long time. Until last week.

I am referring to the data breach on 50M Americans who have accounts with Facebook. Well, this is not the first instance, but in terms of scale it is the biggest ever. There have been hacks on Apple’s iCloud, releasing personal data of celebrities. There have been other hacks such as the bad one on Yahoo mail.

But, people forget and forgive, the reason being that they still need the services of the social media companies, cloud service providers and email operators. There is just no alternative to leading one’s life today – if an individual is not on Facebook, he does not exist – not just virtually, but physically as well! He or she is ignored for lack of digital savviness, or inability to be in sync with the rest of the world which seems to be rushing into Twitter, Instagram, Snap, WeChat, WhatsApp, Line, Google’s variety of offerings including of course Search, and so many such digital tools.

So, things will be back to normal after a few months for Facebook. They will undergo detailed investigation that is reserved for Russian hackers, questioned on Capitol Hill, excoriated in the “adult” networking circuit, and punished in some way, like being forced to implement tougher security measures. Facebook’s reputation currently is in the dumps, and they should not be trusted as they have traded their users’ data. But apart from all this, do you think that anything substantive will happen to them? There are more than 2B users who depend on Facebook for communication. Not me however – I never seriously used the consumer version of Facebook, though I have an account with very sparse data on myself (I however use a corporate version of Facebook behind my company’s firewall for internal teamwork and collaboration, along with other tools such as Microsoft Teams and Yammer).

So here I am – not a regular user of the consumer version of Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, et al, but a serious blogger on this WordPress platform and LinkedIn user. I select what I wish to do, and cannot be led to use some tool that I do not wish to use. Further, I am careful not to accept terms and conditions of these tool makers and platform owners, and do not click to give access to all my data voluntarily. Neither do I agree for unsolicited marketing communications from these folks or their marketing collaborators, though sometimes it is made difficult not to agree.

The question is – what is more important: maintain privacy or lose it due to either the lack of security of the provider or his desire to sell off my data for money? In my case, the answer is crystal clear – I would rather forego the convenience of “checking into” Facebook and detailing what I am up to, or posting my photographs enjoying a vacation with my family, but safeguard whatever little privacy that I still have. It is not necessary for the entire world or my friends and relatives, or for any government, to know what I am doing at this moment (I am blogging now!). It is irrelevant to them, but it is critical for maintaining my sanity. It is not that I am anti-social – I am in multiple WhatsApp groups – but I wish to remain private. I do not respond to LinkedIn invites from people who I have not yet met. I should know the person through a referral or I should have met that person before I would even consider accepting the invite.

Nothing wrong with wanting to be a private individual. However, we know that most teenagers willingly give away their most personal data on the Facebook platform. The issue is that Facebook cannot be trusted to keep that data totally private and secure.  We do not know for sure that the data is safe and secure. We also do not know if they had traded our data for money. We never knew that Facebook gave away the data on 50M Americans to a U.K. Professor for some vague research, who in turn handed that out to the now infamous Cambridge Analytica.

It is more important to spend F2F (“Face to Face”) time with friends, relatives and family, like in the old times. It is more important not to be influenced by hate speech and lectures that are posted on all social media platforms. Did we live without a mobile phone or social media platforms in the past? Did we live a life without networking? We did live well, but I believe we did not learn to adopt technology well in the 21st Century. We just blindly jumped into all that is new without much analysis.

I am not against any of these innovative tools and platforms which have created enormous value to equity investors and users. I think we need to be extra careful in how and why we use these in our lives. Do we give our date of birth or place of birth to our neighbours or strangers? We don’t. We do not share any personal data in public. The same caution applies when we venture into digital space. We cannot ignore the fact that digital platforms are fast proliferating across our lives, and will come to dominate all facets of our existence. We may not be able to order ice cream without a social media account in future, or something as ridiculous as that.

Welcome to a world less private, more intrusive, less secure, and more dangerous as a result.

Hope you enjoyed your weekend.

I am happy to share the fact that I am now allowed one glass of wine, and I will soon be posting on the wine I had and the experience of de-addiction to wine.

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

25th March 2018

Balanced Media Reporting and the Fake News Phenomenon


Just 20 months – that’s all it takes to badly damage the fabric of society and the news media. Today in the U.S. we have very polarized and ugly societal wars between the Left and the Right. That has in turn spawned very ugly and damaging wars between news media which continue to report in their long-established, traditional manner, and the media which has gone berserk towards the extreme right end of the political spectrum. The neutral media was always considered to be, ever so slightly, tilting to the left, and we all know that there is nothing that is absolutely neutral in this world. Everyone has an opinion, whether he or she voices it or not. We also know that when the silent majority does not voice its dissent on any matter, the country or the world is “in” for a major battle. When they do express their dissent, we can expect transformative change.

I have consistently followed both the “left” and the “right” media, to derive a real sense of where the world is heading. While many a time the neutral or “left-tilting” media is right, I have also seen instances when the “rightist” media gets it right for a change.

Achieving a balanced reporting stance is a hard thing to accomplish in today’s heavily polarized world. Couple of examples come to my mind: one is “BBC News” and the other is “CNN”. There are other excellent examples which I do follow such as “The NewYork Times” and “The Washington Post”, but sometimes they do take a harsh view of the right. I continue to enjoy their incisive analyses and opinion pieces, however. I also occasionally look at the “HuffPost” and “MSN News” – they are great alternatives, though clearly on the left.

On the right, my favourite is “Fox News” – there are rather interesting pieces of journalism that I read almost everyday, pretty captivating episodes, and well-intentioned, yet clearly manipulated headlines. There are many media channels on the right, of course, but I find more time for Fox News everyday.

I also follow two rather unconventional media diligently every day. These are “Aljazeera English” edition and “Russia Today (RT) News”. While Aljazeera is relatively new for me, RT News has been a staple for at least couple of years. I believe that both these “alternative media” provide a dose of reality as seen from their respective perches. I have seen wonderful and balanced coverage and analyses in both, and I am now of the firm opinion that the day is not complete without reading the headlines of both media.

I recently eliminated “The Hindu” and “The Guardian” apps from my iPhone – “The Hindu” being the oldest, yet running English language newspaper from South India and “The Guardian” from the U.K. I occasionally see their full web versions, and sometimes my research takes me to their archives. Nothing wrong with either one of their apps, however I felt they were a bit slow on news coverage and their analyses, and sometimes unnecessarily critical of the establishment.

From all of the above, you may come to the quick conclusion that I spend most of my morning hours reading these apps, looking for angles to write about in my blog! That is not true, my intent is to keep myself constantly updated on what is going on around the world, while uncovering some learning from the actions or inactions of global leaders.

With all this stuff, it unnerved me when I heard that some of what we read from global news media could be “fake” – what U.S. President Donald Trump has termed as “Fake News”. It has always been a possibility that some of what we hear could be wrong, or incorrect, but then responsible broadcast media make amends and apologize for any inadvertent errors on their part. That is pretty normal, because people do make mistakes.

But “Fake” news? Is that not a deliberate attempt to replace the correct news with deception to suit the political orientation of the media owners or editors? Yes, it is. But then who practices it? If you go by what Mr Trump says, almost all major news media – CNN, MSN, CBS, ABC, AP, and others who report on what he says, and what he does, are reporting “fake news” every day. Not that Americans are running away from these long-established broadcast media – most of them have grown up with these media, and they control the airwaves for the most part. It would be interesting to see the results of a survey which measures Americans’ responses to Trump’s fake news allegations.

Whatever it is, in my opinion the “fake news” phenomenon does not exist in the way it has been described. There is only one news, and most of us get it right every morning. Some of these could be incorrect, but that inaccuracy lasts only for a few hours before it is replaced with the correct content we should have seen.

There is a lot of satire by the U.S. late night shows on Trump, his tweets and his fake news. If the news as reported in the major news media is not as per his expectations, then that becomes fake news, and this “expectation” of Trump has smeared his presidential reputation to no end.

In a nutshell, we have to see both sides of the same coin. Balance is eventually achieved in our head because we are trained to see the right from the wrong. Our brains are hard-wired, and so sometimes we tend to fall on the side of the news that we really like to see. But then brain realizes its mistake and brings itself back to neutrality.

Enjoy your news via newspapers if you still get one. I get most of mine via the news apps, while still subscribing to The Straits Times which I never finish reading.

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

2nd December 2017

The Big Bang Theory


I started seeing this CBS TV Serial some 3 months ago only.

Now I am kind of addicted for those 30 minutes.

This is easily the best TV sitcom that I have ever seen (that’s not to say much though !), which sees me asking for more. The cast of the serial is just amazing, there is a lot to be said about the extremely careful selection process. All the main characters – Leonard, Sheldon, Howard, Raj, Penny, Bernadette and Amy – keep delivering outstanding performances.

The best things that I like about The Big Bang Theory are its scientific, mathematical and physics orientation (which is a rarity in TV serials), combined with amazing interpolation of quick-hitting catch-phrases and sentences from the main characters (with a hint of mischievous humour on most occasions). One has to be really fast to follow the dialogues as sometimes these dialogues are tainted with some heavy physics or mathematical analogies. Not that one is going to learn anything about physics or advanced mathematics, but the feel of the show is that the four guys are real nerds working for one of the most advanced institutes in the world (Caltech, I guess).

I keep laughing continuously especially with the quick repartees from Sheldon, and the quaint, surprised look which comes often in the face of Leonard.

The female participation has been well leveraged, but I regret the exit of the character Leslie (who is almost a better physicist than Sheldon and often challenges him) from the series. Amy, while a good nerdy match to Sheldon, is not able to compete with Sheldon on actual physics theories !

All in all, The Big Bang Theory is easily the best TV sitcom out there that is continuously entertaining and thought-provoking in a silly manner. The cast is probably the best one can assemble for such a serial, and they seem to be keeping the flame burning bright as the serial proceeds through the current season (which is Season 5 in India). I think that this is eminently relaxing and entertaining, though sometimes I feel a bit awkward having my son watching it along with me !

Try seeing this serial and you will see what I mean apart from the scientific impact !!

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan
4th August 2012
Mumbai