Rumination of a Non-Musical Mind


I was rarely influenced by music all this while. It is surprising, but it is the way that I have come up with, building a totally non-musical mind. I did not deal with stress by listening to music, but by doing a variety of things almost non-stop, actually not relaxing at all. I have known this for a very long time, but could not shake the well-entrenched habit of rushing from one thing to the next.

Music of the Bollywood type sometimes interested me for the rhythmic tunes and the accompanying dance, but I quickly forgot the songs, sometimes reminded of a specific song when it played on radio. I was just not interested in the non-movie music of any kind. Except…………..

Yes, there are always some exceptions to the way one works.

I was deeply influenced by the story of Karen Carpenter, so I am a fan of “The Carpenters” which was the first album I stored on my iPhone many years ago. I often listen to it while driving and taking a long early morning walk. I also developed a fascination for two other bands which were popular in the Seventies and Eighties: ABBA and BoneyM. These albums also feature on my iPhone, apart from albums of Lionel Ritchie and Michael Jackson. That is it – yes, I have only these few albums in my phone, for reasons which are not that common: influence by the story of the artist or the band, an understanding of the message in some of the songs, etc., Not really because the artist or the band or the album was ground-breaking or major hits in the market.

Of late, I have started using Spotify on my iPhone as my mind turns to the soothing power of a music or song that impacts my mood in a strongly positive manner. It is a rather slow transition for me as I am learning slowly how to relax totally without disrupting the rest of my ecosystem and thinking. I do not wish to be totally dominated by music like how fans sing passionately along with a famous band on stage, appearing to be almost in a trance. It is not that important to me to be able to follow and chase a music icon that I otherwise like or prefer. May be I am not young, may be I am not driven by passion in every walk of life, may be I just do not wish to spend SGD 200 plus for a 1.5 hour concert, so on and so forth.

On Spotify, I found couple of artists that I have started to like: one is Ed Sheeran, and the other is Bryan Adams. There are countless artists, bands and albums, and there is not enough time. I tend to focus on the people I like, instead of throwing a wider net. I also try figuring out what these guys really sing, by downloading the lyrics of at least the songs I like and trying to understand how the English language can be “treated” to sound so much more stylish and what I call “rapidly coalescing” into the listeners’ minds. I also read up on the history of the particular artist or band, and that has always been very interesting.

For example, I went walking for an hour this morning (as I do on 6 out of the 7 days in a week), and thought it will be good to listen to Bryan Adams. It was a good experience – I should say I enjoyed his songs. I had to decode the words in some of the songs, but that is normal for me. Couple of days ago I played Ed Sheeran who was more intense on the emotions. Such comments bring out tough remarks, but to everyone his own, right?

Gradually I am transforming what was a completely non-musical mind into a “slightly more musically” oriented mind. My wife has always been a musically influenced and knowledgeable person with good grasp of Tamil and Sanskrit songs – she had always tried to persuade me to relax with such music. She even suggested that I should try to focus my mind with the sound of “OM” which has a ringing tone which never seems to end. But I have only been curious and experimental, rather than a disciplined executioner when it came to music for a very long time.

Now, I am trying to discipline my mind with the hope that it will be better ordained, relaxed and loosened up with some good music. There are, of course, reasons why music is so popular with most people, apart from pure relaxation. I have seen people truly enjoying soft music for instance, closing their eyes ever so often. I have seen people enjoying blaring music which affects all folks within earshot. And I have seen people who play great music around the house designed to deliver a calming influence on all household folks (and, hopefully reduce conflicts!).

Well for me, the big benefit is the increased ease with which I walk and complete nearly 5 KMs of brisk walk every morning. Music has helped me (though without it, I was anyway walking) to make the experience pleasurable, with the mind focusing more on the song, the artist, the band, the album, and the lyrics rather than the effort of walking with sweat streaming through my shirt. As things get easier to do, one tends to follow the new methodology more closely and in a more effective manner. I have to add here, of course, that my new bluetooth wireless earphones have just been amazing!

So, that has been my limited experience with music.

Have a good weekend, folks,

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

01 June 2019

The “all-screen” Addiction


I am not a TV watcher or movie goer.

I rarely go for movies (on the average once in six months) in a theatre, or watch soap operas. I occasionally see CNN or CNBC or BBC on the home TV, more because I like the anchor or the presenter rather than the content of the news. Most news that I consume is via iPhone apps anyway, so I am more or less current on global affairs anyway.

However, after the advent of NetFlix which I have subscribed to (on behalf of the family of course), there have been some change in my behavioural pattern. I liked a few of the original NetFlix serials and a few movies. Initially, I used to see once per week. Later, it became twice and thrice a week, as I could not resist the urge to know more about the next episode of a particular serial. While movies can be had in one sitting of mostly less than 2 hours, serials can drive you towards serious addiction, as multiple episodes would generally be available for viewing at one go – which means you can sit through some 3 to 4 episodes, each spanning some 45 minutes. And, you are never happy and “complete” as there are many more episodes of the same serial still pending for your viewing and ultimate pleasure.

I must have seen at least 10 serials over the past 6 months or so – some of these are not finished, still continuing and I have not completed the viewing though multiple unviewed episodes are available for my viewing. I have more or less stopped seeing NetFlix movies, as my general rating is not more than 3.0 out of 5.0 for most of the movies. But serials have been good and absorbing, though I felt that several of these were unnecessarily dragging on without closure – similar to the Tamil language TV serials in multiple TV channels in Tamil Nadu (and elsewhere in India).

I think, by now, I have developed an addiction for NetFlix serials. What this means is simple – if I have nothing else to do, I tend toward NetFlix viewing, there seems to be not much else to do. This is wrong, and this is how bad addictions start (all addictions are bad). I have to shake myself off NetFlix, but sometimes I feel that I am paying for it, so I have to at least see some – get some viewing on NetFlix as my “share” of the overall family viewing experience and cost amortization. This is an useless argument, as we all know. Like cigarette or drug use, it is hard to drop TV addiction once you start liking and enjoying it. We do nothing while seeing TV or NetFlix – we are dumbos avidly lapping up the dishes served on the screen. Is this a good thing? No, not at all. I wouldn’t be surprised if clinics/hospitals/ashrams start NetFlix de-addiction programs and charge people a bomb for it, as most folks are getting sucked into NetFlix – especially in countries like India where the pricing is very low. In many countries such as India, Indonesia, Malaysia, China, etc., mobile data consumption has shot up in a huge manner due to video viewing on mobiles by people of all demographics, especially millennials.

I am also addicted to YouTube – I see Stephen Colbert and Seth Myers every morning (my time) on my iPhone, and also see other stand-up comedians like Russell Peters, Rowan Atkinson, Hasan Minhaj, et al………again, I could not resist this simple temptation – after all it is some 30 minutes during my early morning hours. But then, I have created a pattern now which I believe might turn out to be harmful in the long run. Looks like I cannot live without YouTube, NetFlix, WhatsApp, and so many other apps.

On top of all this going on (not just in my case, but for most people I know), my son subscribed to Amazon’s PrimeVideo at the ridiculous price of SGD 2.99 per month – that is INR 150 per month! Much lower than NetFlix price of SGD 13.98 per month. Apart from the equivalent of NetFlix, Amazon Prime has other benefits such as a 2-hour delivery of items ordered, etc., and a free-month of PrimeVideo. I dilly-dallied for some time, but eventually approved the subscription. This means that my addiction problems are now doubled instantaneously. I thought of chucking out NetFlix, but after using PrimeVideo I decided it would be better to keep NetFlix going – as I found it to be a far better option. I still managed to see two movies on PrimeVideo before calling it a day, though my family thinks it is a better option!

Now you see my problem? Dealing with this addiction is going to be a bigger challenge than the usual corporate issues or inter-personal matters. Addiction is slated to be the biggest challenge for most millennials, but I am no millennial. My experience proves that addiction can happen at any age or any time and anywhere. In fact, I pulled out my iPhone on a high-speed train in China recently, connected it to the train WiFi and started seeing NetFlix serials! Come on, not a good way to spend time – you should be doing emails or creating a business plan while on such a nice transportation system. I am thinking constantly of how to go back to pre-NetFlix days when I was not disturbed by the feasibility of such on-demand movies and serials. I think I should. What do you think? Are you having this addiction? How are you dealing with it? Do you think such an addiction is bad? How will our children view us when we are constantly engaged on viewing a movie or serial on a laptop or on mobile phone, or even on the home TV? Feels like those days when TV was dominant…………..and grabbed all the family time.

Let me come up with a de-addiction plan. In the meanwhile, here’s wishing you a wonderful week ahead, folks.

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

17th February 2019


Shoot the Piano Player: Andhadhun


Well, let me get to my movie rating quickly. Andhadhun is a good movie, no doubt about it. It is a murder mystery, and has several murders in it. Sriram Raghavan is a good director given to multiple twists and turns, and keeps the audience guessing as to which way the movie is taking, and throws in a totally unexpected surprise towards the end, and all of that.

While I would give the first half of the movie a 4.5 rating (on a scale of 5), the second half of the movie gets no more than a 3.0. Overall, I would have to give a rating of, let me say, 3.8 – actually, my wife may not agree to this rating, she thought the movie flagged and meandered in the second half, so probably she would give it a 3.5.

“Andhadhun” is a well-directed movie, Mr. Raghavan does a great job. To decipher the movie’s logic, you need to be in his shoes and see what he sees through his characters. It will be challenging, let me assure you, as you are likely to miss certain cues and clues as your mind is racing fast forward to solve the mystery which has been presented to you – and you are acting like a Sherlock Holmes in unraveling the mystery.

While I knew or felt that the piano player would survive all the attempts to murder him by several players, I could not have forecasted the multiple twists that he would be put through before he finally survived! That play by the director was outstanding, in terms of eliminating all the other “bad” characters in an unsuspecting manner towards the end of the movie. However, the movie has an “open” ending, our piano player hero does not choose to connect ultimately with the heroine who has had a crush on him but deserts him when she found out about his false infidelity, perpetrated by the main antagonist who murdered her own husband. So what is the real ending? Our hero kicks the coke can on the street!

It is an unusual plot, and I was not surprised to learn that the director has given credit to a French movie called L’Accordeur (Piano Tuner). French mystery movies are my favourites, and I have seen plenty of them in the past. Concepts such as a twisted murder mystery plagued by suspicions and more murders are best handled by French directors with their dollops of creativity and expert direction.

While I would not reveal the plot details of the movie in this post, suffice it to state that “what you see is not what you get”. You must understand that our piano player hero plays his first role not as a real blind man, but as a simulated blind guy – which means he can actually see what he sees, like all of us. In the next role, the main antagonist blinds him willfully for real, so this time our piano player really becomes blind. His reaction when he finds out that he has totally lost his eyesight is a priceless enactment of his real feelings, as compared to the previous simulations as a pseudo blind guy. It is funny how the audience learns about his fake blindness via the tracking of a small boy who lives in the same housing block as our hero, who becomes suspicious and even goes to the extent of tying his smartphone on a long stick to film the “real” normal hero who is performing the daily chores like a normal person would do!

My view of Bollywood movies still remains the same – “not much substance” in most of the movies coming out. But, Andhadhun is a refreshing change – once in a long while, we do get some real good movies, but let us not forget that these are adaptations of Western movies and their directorial impact. While it is fine to adapt, the fact is that the concept has already been tried and tested out, and our Bollywood director is adapting the storyline to his tastes. I don’t know if I am wrong on this count. I am, however, looking for truly original concepts and storylines like what we sometimes get from Malayalam or Bengali movies with lot of thought about a social mechanism and impact of real-life humanity on a movie’s story.

Nothing wrong with Andhadhun, except for the flailing second half which could have been speeded up, instead of engaging in unnecessary dialogues. The director had total control in the first half of the movie with a crisp plot and amazing execution. He could have carried it through to the second half instead of the convoluted plot which becomes confusing – though it might be deliberate.

You can see Andhadhun on NetFlix now, which is what I did.

Cheers, and have a great week ahead folks,

Vijay Srinivasan

23rd December 2018

Crazy Rich Asians


This is the name of a recent movie which depicts a cross-cultural love story between an American (Chinese) professor, who looks rather young to be a professor, and a very rich Singaporean Chinese man, who hides his richness from the professor.

In my sincere opinion, this movie was a disappointment.

While I believe there is richness in terms of obscenely rich in every society, the manner in which Singapore is depicted in this movie shifts the needle more towards obscenity in terms of ostentatious display of wealth and arrogant positioning taken by the key characters against people of lesser means (like the professor who grew up in New York with a poor mother). The movie also demonstrates that there is utter racism even among the same ethnicity (Chinese) when it comes to haves and have-nots; and the “haves” have serious issues in accepting the have-nots who they view as people with less of royalty in their blood, of poor origins and taste, no wealth and no pedigree. We have seen such tendencies and attitudes in India as well.

The movie goes to prove that when it comes to integration between the rich and the poor, the Western societies have done a much better job. The Asian societies are still steeped in conservatism and a superiority complex which they find hard to shed. More I think about it, more it appears to be true; I may sound a bit contradictory, but that is because I am defensive on Singapore, which unlike Hong Kong as an example, avoids ostentatious display of wealth, though to be sure there are hundreds of cars which are worth USD 500K and more on the road, and condominiums range from USD 1M to USD 10M, and houses could range from USD 2M to USD 50M. However, you do not witness what you see in the movie – there are no crazy rich “Chinese” running around the city in jeeps and revving their sports car engines, and dancing away the night. If anything, Singapore is known for its hard-working people who have built an incredible society and country from what was just a marshland some six decades ago.

Coming back to the stark contrast between Asian and Western societies, it is apparent that the Western countries have “equalized” their societies in terms of acceptance of folks based on merit only (in most cases) and less emphasis placed on sheer wealth and connections. There can be no movie like “Crazy Rich Asians” which revolves around America for instance – there will be no “Crazy Rich Americans/Caucasians” kind of movie as there is no story there! A cross-cultural mix is so normal in America or even in Europe these days, but it is still a wonder in Asia. What is then so unique about two Chinese people falling in love with each other – not even one White and one Chinese mixing together? The only difference is the obscene wealth of the hero’s family and the attitudes of his family towards newcomers into their family who are not of their richness level.

While there is a story line in the movie, it is nothing outstanding. It is a story of unstoppable romance, and I knew for sure that our hero is going to pop up in the plane towards the end of the movie, which is due to depart with our heroine and her mother……..getting out of our hero’s life for good. It is so very much like a Bollywood movie – in fact, there are hundreds of such movies in Bollywood and Kollywood, when the hero and the heroine reunite after breaking their respective hearts and the viewers’ hearts, who are disappointed that they have broken up.

The movie rambles on for quite a while after the couple arrive in Singapore……..I do not see the rationale for certain sequences which are garish like at the friend’s house of the heroine. I would have preferred a simple friend who lives in a HDB (Housing Development Board) apartment with a more “common man” view of the society that we all live in here! That would have been more humane as well, and would have brought our hero into that kind of abode for a change!!

So, in essence, this is a movie which would result in a wedding ultimately between the two people in love, but would never rest the case of the ultra-wealthy family of the hero in Singapore, which is looking for their first son to take over the reins of the family business from the father, marry into another wealthy family, and run the business and make even more money. I am reminded of the Ambani family in India here. So, how can the hero’s mother be peaceful? She will try to create more problems for the couple, though they might return to New York for what they perceive to be a simple married life as a middle class couple.

This probably explains why a sequel is already being planned for this movie. Is it surprising? Not at all.

Given a better understanding, I would have avoided seeing this movie as it corrupts my view of Singapore and the Singaporean way of life. This movie would surely be a hit if it is adapted by Bollywood for an Indian version of the movie. That is not surprising at at all – they will just add more songs, and some car races, show Jaipur/Jodhpur palaces, et al.

Enjoy your weekend with other excellent movies that are available on Netflix or elsewhere!

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

8th December 2018

Grandmaster


I selected a Malayalam language movie for a change this time around.

I think Malayalam and Bengali movies are the best ones that came out of India. These two states – Kerala (Malayalam) and West Bengal (Bengali) – continue to produce quality, thoughtful, and deep artistic movies which are sometimes provocative, compared to the fun (lovers running around the trees) and emotional movies from Bollywood (mostly Hindi), Kollywood (mostly Tamil) and Tollywood (mostly Telugu).

This is also the reason why national award-winning “art” movies mostly originate from these two states of India. Many a time, such movies could be boring, long-winded and totally fun-less in their dramatization, and so fail to make it to the box office, but seriously appreciated by critical audience.

As I was browsing Netflix recently, I saw that they have created a separate special section for Indian movies with some pretty good selection – I found that I have not seen most of the movies! I selected “Grandmaster” because it was a thriller and sounded like a mysterious serial killer kind of movie, and the cast of actors was also good. It took me almost 3 sittings to finish the movie during the previous week.

Grandmaster is all about a top intelligent cop trying to solve a serial murder mystery in earnest, as he discovers that the murderer is going to hit close to home – or at his own ex-wife. Mohanlal (I am using real actors’ names here) delivers an excellent performance as a senior police official who has lost his way due to separation from his wife, and who is being egged on by the Police Commissioner to do better at his new assignment, which is about stopping crimes before they happen (!). I thought the director has done a good job weaving the story around Mohanlal’s own life, sending key messages from various actors throughout the movie which Mohanlal captures due to his past experience as a cop and trained intelligence. It was very interesting to see how he single-handedly identifies what is going on in the serial killer’s mind in the old fashion police detective manner – there are no fancy tools here, not even fingerprint analysis. Mohanlal displays a thoughtful demeanour as someone who is constantly thinking through the various scenarios, and finding clues at the murder scenes which others do not seem to find. Well then this is the hero’s work and it is to his credit, right? It is funny that the police does not even attempt to trace the letters coming to Mohanlal directly from the serial killer.

The killer is shown to the audience, though he is unknown (not yet known to Mohanlal)  till the end of the movie. But the assumed killer is not the real one, and therein lies the mystery of this movie. The killer we see at the murder scene of the first victim (Alice) has the rough edges with a suspicious look, and we more or less fall for the ruse of the director. He is involved, but he is not the real killer; he is a mentally deranged person, effectively directed and used by the real killer. I am sure that if we dig around we could find some old Hollywood movies like the Grandmaster.

How this killing plot ties in with Mohanlal’s ex-wife is a big twist and relates to why they two separated in the first place. I liked the way that the director brings in Priyamani (Mohanlal’s ex-wife) to share with Mohanlal the whole story about a court case which she won against Mohanlal’s police work, and how that ties back to the murders happening now.

I have not seen even Bollywood directors thinking in this seriously convoluted fashion. Mysterious and seriously interesting! Mohanlal pieces together the puzzle on his office chessboard and solves it in his own mind, but waits for the killer to make the final move against his ex-wife, and he is ready.

Like most movies, the director is now used to throwing twist after twist at the audience, and so spins one last one on stage with the real killer making the appearance and then explaining why he did what he did and what he is going to do right at this moment. I do not understand why police and others at such a scene would allow such a dissertation by a serial killer who acknowledged he killed all the 3 women before coming for Mohanlal’s ex-wife! But this is Indian cinema and even Malayalam movies cannot escape such demonstration of what I call “unreality”.

In a nutshell, I liked the movie and the manner in which it has been directed by Unnikrishnan, and also the acting of Mohanlal. There is almost negligible violence (I am not counting the easy murders executed using a simple long duppatta cloth!), the characters are delivering what is expected of them, and the story line is pretty decent. At the end of the day, as audience we expect an interesting and engaging delivery – and Grandmaster delivers it. It is not very highly rated, but it does not bother me. I think I should start rating movies, like how I rate my wines!

I recommend seeing Grandmaster. It is a good, thoughtful movie, well acted and directed. It was clearly not a waste of my time, as the movie made me think about human beings and the extent to which they can go in life to untangle life’s mysteries – in this case, the brother of Paul Mathews (the guy who was killed by one of the women who was later murdered) traces the people involved in his brother’s murder and one by one, eliminates those people, but the audience does not know about this till the end of the movie – that is the aura of a mystery movie!

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

01 December 2018

96 and other movies


Over the past 10 days or so, I had the opportunity to see 4 movies, which is rather unusual. Nowadays, it has become my regular habit to see some Netflix serial to relax and I have become a fan of Netflix based on the variety of shows and movies that they present. I recently saw “The Angel” on Netflix which is a full movie involving Egypt – Israel war and relationship.

Since I was visiting Chennai last week, my family booked not one, but two movies which anyway they were planning to see in theatre – I was just added to the ticket list! I thought why not, let us see Kollywood fare for a change [Kollywood stands for movies produced in Chennai, the Tamil Nadu capital city in South India, as against Bollywood which identifies movies produced out of Bombay, or Mumbai, the movie capital of India].

My sister selected “96” and “Johnny English Strikes Again”. The first was a unique love story and the second was Mr Bean in action as a British intelligence agent. Again, unusual selection of movies for a change!

Apart from the above, I also saw “Imaikka Nodigal” yesterday, which is a rather strange, unusual Tamil thriller.

OK, now let me give you a quick rundown on what I think of these movies. These are not full movie reviews, just my short opinion. So, my view may not corroborate with what a generalist population thinks or how you feel. I refuse to fall into the cult of heroism of any movie actor or actress, which unfortunately plagues much of India. Whether I like an actor’s acting or not is not a reflection on what I think about that actor – it is the result of the actor’s acting under a particular set of constraints, directed by a director who may or may not be able to bring the best out of the actor, and also contributed in large measure by co-actors.

Given then that I am not a typical “movie buff” or a “hero/heroine follower”, I was pleased with the above selection overall. Let me outline my views as below:

“The Angel”: This is a true-life story of Ashraf Marwan, who was the son-in-law of Egyptian President, Gamel Abdel Nasser. Probably Marwan was a double-spy working both for Mossad of Israel and President Anwar Sadat of Egypt. He is also probably the only hero felicitated in both Egypt and Israel as a national icon who persevered for peace between the two countries. The complex question of whether peace in the Middle East is worth the sacrifice of passing military secrets between two of the most critical nations at war is forever a challenging one to decipher. The mind of Marwan is portrayed as complex and sort of, convoluted. He struggles with himself while trying to do his job and save his family. His job becomes rather difficult given that he is viewed as an ineffectual son-in-law of a powerful President (Nasser). Israel’s Mossad handles Marwan well in the beginning but loses its confidence when key assertions by Marwan do not pan out.

An interesting and dramatic history lesson, “The Angel” is a fascinating watch – especially for us who are far removed from the Middle East.

“96”: This is a beautiful Tamil language movie centred on the teenage love between the two prime characters. It has an excellent cast, and a great director. The movie can be considered to be “slow” paced in today’s world. While I was seeing the movie, I was wondering what I did during my Grade X! Nothing unique, as I was not in a co-ed school anyway. This movie will prod you to reminisce on your school days, especially on the stupid things – I am not meaning the teenage infatuation here! Sorry!!

Nostalgia gets a new meaning when you experience what the characters go through in this movie. It happens to be a love story which did not go well, but it could have been anything. How the hero and heroine (who could not consummate their love) deal with a long night without even so much as touching each other is very well shot by the director and beautifully acted by the two actors. You would guess that they are on to “something” and that is what the friends of the two actors also think, going by visual and body language. Nothing of that sort happens though, and the heroine returns to her family while longing for what she has lost in her life by some stupid reaction. See the movie for learning what she did in college!

“Johnny English Strikes Again”: Absolute nonsense made enjoyable by the antics of our favourite comedian of all times, Mr Bean. I would not gone to see this movie in a theatre spending some serious money as it is all the same nonsense anyway when it comes to British spy stories. This is a ridiculous story about some software bloke who steals the identities of all secret service agents in Britain, and so the government leans on Johnny English to save the Queen’s country from blackmail. The unique point in this movie is the depiction of “older analogue” technologies by an agent who has not yet comprehended the latest digital technologies of spying and warfare. He still wins (he has to, of course), but then everything about this movie is not realistic or believable at all. For some time passing and laughter, yes go and see it. But is it worth spending money on? No, not at all. Mr Bean should stop acting in such totally stupid movies when even the common man thinks it is totally rubbish when Mr Bean cannot even handle an app on his smartphone and trashes it. How is he even going to get his position on the map? Give it a miss.

“Imaikka Nodigal” Absolute thriller with lots of twists and turns. I did not expect the last 15 minutes which reveals who is the actual murderer on the loose. The suspense is kept on for almost the entire duration of the movie and the audience suspects that it is someone who has been revealed by the director early on in the movie – but that does not turn out to be entirely true. This movie is in the league of high quality Hollywood movies of the same genre. That a director of the calibre of Anurag Kashyap from Bollywood can act so well (he is the menacing serial killer in this movie) is a huge surprise. The director has done an amazing job – excellent movie.

Enjoy your weekend, folks! And, see some good movies!!

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

13th October 2018

 

 

 

A Quiet Place


I really enjoyed this horror movie, though I could not convince my wife to join in the viewing – she said it is too much of horror nonsense. I agree that the story of the movie is not realistic, but who knows – the way the world is moving, anything can happen.

“A Quiet Place” is a very well directed movie – its director John Krasinski also is the lead actor. The lead actress is Emily Blunt, who is also John’s real-life spouse. She deserves an award for showing so much fear in her face and acting her role so well. The movie revolves around a family of four who are left behind in this world dominated by some weird creatures who cannot see but can hear sounds. Once they hear any kind of sound, they swoop in on their prey which made that sound and kill the prey – and they are horrible looking, to say the least. So, the whole movie is more or less silent, with our actors communicating using sign language for most of the time.

Since sounds cause so much fear in our actors, we as audience are so attuned to any kind of sound emanating from the TV screen or even from around us physically. If somebody in the house drops something on the ground, you react to it, because the entire movie is eerily silent and sounds cause death by the vile creatures roaming around.

The family unit is tightly knit, having lost one of the children to the creature after he made some noise using a toy aeroplane. Can you tolerate such a thing, when the father is running towards his boy who is causing the sound, and before he could reach the boy, the creature has swooped in, grabbed the boy and taken him away for its lunch?

The imagination of the story and the director is to be highly commended. I did not feel scared at all while viewing this movie. I just wanted to find out what happens to this lonely family, where the only company they keep is to each other. The mom teaches mathematics to her son without making any sound. The dad is building an earphone device which would allow his deaf daughter (so well acted by Millicent Simmonds) to hear sounds so that she could avoid the creatures. The boy (again acted well by Noah Jupe) is being taught by the dad on how to get under a waterfall and mask their conversation in the sound of water. And so on, and so forth. Amazing imagination and beautiful editing.

I am not going to spoil the suspense by revealing what happened towards the end of the movie. I think the movie demonstrates the critical importance of the family unit learning from each other and supporting each other, and also the human ability to think through solutions to any kind of problems. I really loved the discovery of the solution by Simmonds which was recognized instantaneously by Emily (her mom). At least, they found a way to ward off the creatures, and with luck, incapacitate them when they come for the kill.

I could not stop seeing this movie – it was a short one at 90 minutes. It created a lot of expectations in me and I was totally involved in how the movie was unfolding, trying to guess what is going to happen. Such things happen only in horror or crime movies. And, “A Quiet Place” is indeed a wonderful horror movie which can be enjoyed by the whole family (not only dads like me!), and the key point is that it is not scary while causing muscle tension! You have to be prepared for the unexpected sequence.

I would strongly recommend this movie as a good alternate to usual Hollywood movies that do not engage each and every member of the audience. This movie does that in an effective manner. I would not be surprised if “A Quiet Place” is nominated for the Oscars. One of the actors could also receive a nomination. I wonder why we do not have such depth in the Bollywood and Kollywood movies from India. This is all about the imagination, the craftiness, the insight of the author(s) who could visualize a world without any protection against evil creatures. There is no protection at all – all the protectors are gone for ever. If you see the fear in the faces of our actors (except of the dad who is John), you will know how well they communicate what could be a real situation, how well they are getting prepared to face the inevitable and delay the consequences of making any kind of sound which appears to be impossible. How do you then deal with a new born child which will make noises? It happens in this movie!

Cheers

Vijay Srinivasan

8th September 2018