Tagged: Transportation

Chicago O’Hare and Jet Lag


I flew from Chicago O’Hare International Airport to Singapore via Taipei last weekend. My Eva Air flight was at 00:30 hours, past Friday midnight and I cleared all formalities by 10:15 PM Friday evening.

I was totally surprised at the level of airport activity – there were passengers, of course, and airport personnel, but O’Hare did not look like a major international airport at all. Almost all the restaurants were closed, except for a lousy coffee shop and a bar with no food. This was Terminal 5, and I am sure there might have been more activity in the other terminals, but we could not leave this terminal and go to the others to check out. My family was hungry and so was I, but the maximum we could get was a brownie and coffee. This was simply unacceptable, and I could not resist comparisons with major Asian flight hubs such as Singapore, Seoul, Bangkok or Hong Kong, which are alive with activities 24×7. You can almost get anything you want in the Singapore Changi International Airport even at midnight.

American airports need to be upgraded with more passenger services and better quality infrastructure. These airports are decades old and appear to have hardly seen a major facelift over the years. I saw one DFS shop open with exorbitant prices for almost everything. But as time went on, the activity levels dropped except around the departure gates. I wouldn’t be surprised if the situation was similar in other major international airports in the U.S.

Well, at least the gate handling was uneventful, and Eva Air departure personnel handled the crowd efficiently, and the flight left on time (except for the short taxiing delay of 10 to 15 minutes). I decided to align my body with the time at Chicago and went to sleep after some food. Many folks were seeing movies. I slept for some 6 to 7 hours and when I got up we were some 70% through with our journey time. It was morning time in Chicago and I again aligned my body with some activities like walking around the cabin, stretching the legs, seeing some movies, etc., keeping awake till the plane landed at Taipei. It was going to be 4 AM in Taipei the next day. And, I felt fresh. It worked for me and I had no jet lag at all even after we landed in Singapore around noon time Sunday.

Of course, I went to sleep pretty early Sunday night and had a good 8 hour sleep, and that brought my body in alignment with the local timing in Singapore. However, my family members were having difficulties with jet lag affecting them for couple of days before they felt all right.

So, the key learning was to ensure sync with the origin location of the flight, rather than the destination. This worked for me. I never felt sleepy during late afternoons upon arrival, and this was different from my previous experiences.

Well, Singapore always looks welcoming when we arrive its beautiful airport, so here we are! It was a wonderful vacation in the U.S. and when I walked around New York and Washington, I felt that I should have worked in these places at least once in my lifetime!

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

8th July 2017

 

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Eva Air – a game changer


I flew Eva Air from Singapore to Chicago via Taipei earlier this week.

Last month, I flew Emirates via Dubai to the U.S. and have written about my experience on Emirates. See The Emirates Experience

This time around, I wanted to fly through one of the Asian hubs to the U.S. There were only a few options available – Cathay Pacific via Hong Kong, ANA via Tokyo Narita, JAL via Tokyo Narita, Korea Air via Seoul or Eva Air via Taipei. You may wonder why I did not consider Singapore Airlines. The answer is simple – I cannot afford it, whether for a business trip or a personal vacation. SIA is overpriced in all sectors going to Europe or the U.S., for almost similar quality of experience with other airlines listed above.

After some serious evaluation which included the dates on which I have to fly, I settled on Eva Air, and this was the very first time I was going to fly with Eva Air. I purchased the Premium Economy ticket, considering the long journey and the need to arrive fresh for some urgent personal work that I had in Chicago. It was around 35% more expensive than the normal Economy Class ticket. Before I decided on Eva Air, I studied the Premium Economy Class comparison of the airlines I had shortlisted, and Eva Air scored at the top of the table due to the comfort offered on this class.

I was not disappointed. Premium Economy seats offered on Eva Air were comfortable with wider seats and much longer leg space. It was almost 75% of the usual business class seat in terms of width of the seat, and the leg space was not cramped – there was good space, and if one is on the first row of this class, it was great – I managed to get one such seat in the long haul from Taipei to Chicago. But even on other rows, the space was very good – I was on one such seat from Singapore to Taipei. Further the Boeing 777 planes were very new, and the flights were smooth sailing for the most part.

However, there were some issues which need to be fixed for the overall flight experience on Eva Air. One was the quality of food, especially for vegetarian selections. Since the point of origin for this flight was Singapore, Eva Air could easily source great vegetarian food, but they did not. It was of average quality (as per my family member). My special meal was better, though it was not as good as that offered on Emirates flights. The other problem was the choice of wines – being in Premium Economy, they should at least offer two white wines and two red wines, but they were offering just one of each type. Not adequate for the ticket price that passengers were paying. The third issue was the quality of service – most of the flight attendants struggled to understand English requests, since they were largely unable to get out of their mother tongue influence. Every one of the flight attendants was a Taiwanese lady, and non-Chinese passengers had to repeat their requests carefully and slowly before they could be understood. The good thing was that the attendants also repeated the passenger’s request so that they could unambiguously understand the same for fulfillment.

Considering the price and quality of Premium Economy offering from Eva Air, I am inclined to state and conclude that it is one of the best around. I was also happy that the 14 hours 20 minutes flight from Taipei to Chicago actually made it to Chicago in 12 hours 40 minutes, though the flight from Singapore to Taipei was delayed by 40 minutes due to rains.

If Eva Air could fix some of the issues, I am sure that it will give a run for the money to the other global Asian airlines on long haul routes. I have to say that I have not experienced the Economy Class on Eva Air, which remains as the Achilles’ heel for most reputed airlines. With its good reputation and mostly on-time performance, and latest range of aircraft, Eva Air has an excellent chance to become one of the top airlines from Asia for long-haul routes. However, the airline needs to look at feedback from global travelers, adopt some of the best practices from other successful airlines such as the Emirates and SQ, and induct a more globalized air crew.

Well, all the best to Eva Air. Keep it up folks!

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

18th June 2017

 

 

The Orchard Experience


This looks like another mundane post, and it probably is one.

After a very, very long time, I decided to do two things today (Saturday).

The first one was to leave the car at home, and take a bus. The second one was to accompany my family for shopping in Orchard Road, after a rather long time. For starters, I do not personally shop for my clothes in Orchard Road malls. For information on where I do shop, wait for another blog post!

Taking a bus in Singapore is always a pleasant experience – and I am doing that after some 20 months or so. The buses are clean and well maintained, with very effective air conditioning and prompt stop arrivals. I was a bit worried whether my Transit Link card (the magnetic card used in Singapore for public transport) will work after such a long time and if there was enough balance in it. It worked and it had some balance, so I breathed a sigh of relief though I had a back up card.

The advantage of having a small population dissolves quickly when one is on public transport or when one visits heavily crowded shopping places like Orchard Road. Today was no exception. Orchard Road was very crowded, and there were people everywhere – especially when I tried to cross traffic lights, the junctions were overcrowded. At any pedestrian crossing, there were some 100 folks waiting to cross. The pavements on Orchard Road are wide, and you can imagine if these pavements are crowded. It appeared to me that the whole of Singapore was intent on Orchard Shopping during the Great Singapore Sale which is currently in progress. The number of cars on the road was unbelievably high. I saw that the car drivers were violating traffic rules, but then their assessment of the change in traffic lights was probably skewed. I would prefer if they make all of Orchard Road car-free during the weekends. Then we can walk anywhere on the road and enjoy complete freedom and also have icecream stalls lining up the road!

Now comes the actual shopping experience. We shopped at Robinsons Heeren on Orchard Road, and Metro in Paragon. Both are good places to shop, though I felt that Robinsons was overpriced even after the hefty discounts. They seem to be inflating the prices and then taking off big discounts, which then appeared to me as “overpriced”. For example, how can a bermuda short be originally priced at SGD 59 and then offered at SGD 33 (which, in my opinion almost twice the price in Kuala Lumpur for example, and 50% more than what one can get in the U.S.). How is this a grand sale? Other examples can easily be cited, but after walking around the 4th Floor of the Robinsons Heeren (Mens Section), I came to the easy conclusion that I can afford only two things in reasonable price range – vests and socks!

Of course, my family went around buying stuff they liked. I realized that my price data switch was always switched on, and was not compatible with the expectations of youngsters. So, I did not comment on purchases made by the family, though I made mild protests on the prices of T-shirts.

We all took a break and went for lunch at the renowned P.S. Cafe located on Level 3 of Paragon Shopping Centre. The food was great, though again overpriced. But then the ambience was excellent. We had to wait for some 20 minutes but it was worth the wait for some very good western food.

My son and I wandered into the newly opened Apple Store located just next to the Heeren building. It was a fabulous sight and experience. All products of Apple and its partners were on display (including drones, speakers, various accessories, etc.,). Looks like a huge investment by Apple but then it could be justified given the impact of the Apple brand in Singapore. Few people were buying anything, but it is still early days I guess.

Overall, the shopping experience on Orchard Road (though limited to couple of places in one small stretch of the road) was very good and I enjoyed it. It has been a while since I did that, and though I did not purchase anything substantive it was good to mingle around and watch folks make their choices. Robinsons had a big walk-in crowd at any time, and it is a trusted brand of Singapore for a long time though I disagree with their pricing strategies. They have to make a big profit to be sustainable given the real estate prices in Singapore and that too, in the most prestigeous Orchard Road, which remains as one of the most reputed shopping areas in the entire world.

On the way back home, we took a Grab taxi which worked out rather cheap (in fact cheaper than the bus) as we got a SGD 5 discount due to the Fifth Anniversary of Grab.

Good shopping and Good public transport experience,

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

10th June 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Emirates Experience


Recently I flew to Dallas on Emirates Airlines (SIN – DUBAI – DALLAS).

The Singapore – Dubai flight was on Airbus 380, which provided a comfortable inflight experience. Emirates generally provides ontime performance, and it was no different this time – landed on time in Dubai and the transit wait was just 2 hours for the next flight. The only disconnect was the non-availability of Indian Vegetarian food for my colleague who is strictly vegetarian and prefers Indian food.

However, the flight to Dallas took longer than the planned time of 14 hours and 45 minutes. It took nearly 16 hours, making it one of the longest flights that I have flown. There could be any number of reasons, one being a 30 minutes delay while taking off from the busy and congested Dubai Airport. It was tiring, though onboard service was good (unlike the U.S. carriers who generally provide shoddy service).

Apart from this long overall duration of over 25 hours from Singapore to Dallas (which could have been around 22 hours had I taken the Singapore – Tokyo – Dallas route including the transit wait), the surprising issue was the experience in Dubai Airport itself while transiting. It was well past midnight when we landed, and the next flight was just 2 hours away taking off from another terminal. Unlike Singapore Changi Airport which has clear guidance to transit passengers, Dubai Airport does not provide guidance and leaves the transit passengers in the lurch. We had to figure out by ourselves how to get to the other distant terminal, and discovered that there is a crowded bus service which brought arriving passengers with no segregation from departing passengers. We had to wait some 20 minutes or so before a bus to pick up departing passengers arrived, which was a large van with a cart to load baggages trucking behind it! This was a curious experience, but we finally made it to the other terminal. I seriously think that Dubai Airport should give this aspect of its experience a rigorous examination.

Well, I have not mentioned the laptop ban issue till now. Emirates Singapore Office gave contradictory information over two phone calls regarding the laptop ban. In the first call, they said that I could carry the laptop as usual till Dubai Airport gate, and then they would take it over till Dallas, and eventually hand it to me upon arrival. During the second call, the lady who handled my call was very confused, and after checking with her supervisor couple of times, asked me to check in my laptop at Singapore itself. After few deliberations, that is what I did, but then found out at the gate in Dubai Airport that Emirates had a neat arrangement for collecting the laptops, packing the same securely, and take them into the cargo hold. And upon arrival at Dallas, Emirates made several announcements at the baggage belt area reminding passengers to collect their respective laptops.

On the way back from Dallas to Singapore, there was no laptop issue (it is a problem only when you arrive in any U.S. airport from any one of the Middle Eastern airports). However, there was a 9-hour transit wait for the flight to Singapore from Dubai, and so I decided to go into town for some shopping with my colleague and a relative of mine who was kind enough to shepherd us. We enjoyed the amazing experience of visiting the Ibn Battuta Mall (see IBN BATTUTA MALL).

Dubai Airport immigration service is fast and efficient. The security check was thorough. One had to walk a long distance of almost 800 metres from the car drop-off point at the airport terminal all the way to security check (it is a very large terminal), and then to the immigration counters.

Well, next time I am flying to the U.S., it is going to be back to the old routine of travelling via Tokyo Narita or Hong Kong. The challenge is that the code share flights are usually operated by American Airlines or United Airlines.

Just got over the jet lag, and now ready for my usual week beginning tomorrow.

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

28th May 2017

Amazing Formula Rossa Thrill Ride of a Lifetime


This time I was really scared.

My son persuaded me to at least take a look at the ride video on YouTube. Take a look for yourself:

Ferrari’s Alonso and Massa ride world’s fastest rollercoaster at Ferrari World

Formula Rossa POV – World’s Fastest Roller Coaster Ferrari World Abu Dhabi UAE Onride

Scary, right?

Well, my son and I went to the Ferrari World, Abu Dhabi last week, and I can tell you that the real experience of riding on the Formula Rossa was not any less scarier than the videos that you just saw. The website of Ferrari World is at Formula Rossa at Ferrari World Abu Dhabi

Formula Rossa is currently rated as the fastest roller coaster in the world with a top speed of 239 KMPH which is achieved in less than 5 seconds of extremely fast acceleration using a technique used on aircraft carriers to launch jet planes on a very short runway. For the initial run, I chose to sit on the very back row of the Formula Rossa – though my son objected. I told him that I need to get a “hang” of it! Even while sitting on the back row, the ride was instantly terrifying with a speed which I have never experienced in my life. My heart beat increased and my heart was pounding when we finished the ride. The air pressure on the face and body was immense. The cork screw turn from the very top was scary to say the least. But the best part was the initial acceleration and the steep climb up.

For the second time experience, my son insisted on sitting in the very first row (like sitting on the very edge of the nose of a fast speeding bullet). I asked for time to think and so went around on other rides and eventually came back to Formula Rossa ride. I agreed to sit with my son on the first row of the ride. And, it was the most terrifying ride I have ever undertaken in a theme park ride. I could not even move my hand, the air pressure was too much not allowing any movement (I wanted to hold the plastic spectacle wrapper which was holding my spectacle glasses). While I managed to keep my eyes open for the initial 4 to 5 seconds, I could not do so once the roller coaster climbed up on to its steep ascent of over 50 metres and then accelerated with heavy momentum on the cork screw. I tried to open for a sneak view but decided to keep it shut as the tracks were speeding towards us at enormous speed (!!!). I only opened my eyes towards the last 5 or 6 seconds of the ride, but came out smiling as the thrill gene in my body seems to have grabbed its rightful sync with the Formula Rossa!

This is a fantastic ride, and I would strongly encourage you to take the first row, if not in the first attempt. It is a great feeling to almost feel what a Formula 1 race driver would experience on the race track (and more). It is overall a fabulous experience and very much worth the visit to Ferrari World (which is located at Abu Dhabi, some 75 minutes car ride from Dubai).

Hold tight and enjoy the speed, acceleration and momentum of the Formula Rossa – the world’s fastest roller coaster as on date.

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

3rd December 2016

 

 

 

 

 

Dispatch from Dubai


I wanted to send this one out before I returned from Dubai, however here it is – a dispatch on the cost dynamics of living in one of the most expensive cities in the world.

There is no income or sales tax in Dubai – there is just no taxation of any kind. So that would be a big incentive for most people as a draw to go and work in Dubai. Sure, it is a nice, and I would say a great feeling when you pay no taxes at all to the government. There are very few places in the world which provide such a strong incentive.

However, the picture is not so simple. Almost all items that one needs to consume are expensive, and even more expensive when compared to Singapore. I think this is true even when a comparison is made with Hong Kong prices of consumption items. May be only Tokyo is more expensive than Dubai.

A Cafe Latte in Starbucks costs 19 AED (Dirhams, the U.A.E. currency), which translates to SGD 7.5 (as against SGD 5.5 in Starbucks Singapore). A decent lunch at a foodcourt in one of the fancy malls of Dubai costs the equivalent of SGD 20 to 25 as against a typical comparable lunch at SGD 11 to 15 in a Singapore mall. All tourist attractions are heavily expensive when it comes to the entrance fees. A typical entrance fee to a theme park or water park costs around AED 270 or SGD 106 – whereas a good price that can be obtained in Singapore for a similar attraction ranges from SGD 40 to 60. Taxi prices are more or less comparable, though the base fare from the Dubai International Airport is AED 25 (or SGD 10) as compared to SGD 6.20 (SGD 3 surcharge from Changi and base fare of SGD 3.20) as base fare from Singapore Changi Airport. There is no apparent reason for such a high base fare.

So, apparently, what the government does not collect is being collected by product and service providers in Dubai via increased prices. The argument that they have to operate with imported labour (mostly Filipinos in service industries) does not fly as the situation is not very different in Singapore for lower-end jobs. The real estate prices are comparable, so that argument also does not work. So, it has to be only the motive of higher profit from the flow of tourists and resident foreigners that is driving higher prices in Dubai.

I have not had the time to do a detailed research on retail prices at Dubai malls (though I bought a couple of items), but had the opportunity to kill some good time at the fabulous shopping areas of Dubai International Airport before departing to Singapore. The liquor prices at the Duty Free Shops were lower than in DFS Changi Shops, and the chocolate prices were marginally lower though the variety of chocolates available was vastly superior in Dubai. I ended up buying good amount of chocolates which are not available in Singapore. The electronic product prices were more or less similar – again, the variety of offerings in Dubai was superior. For example, I saw six different brands of drones in a single shop with almost all accessories as compared to just two brands in a typical Singapore electronics shop. Drones are hot selling items and I am developing an interest as my son is keen to try out the same, and will eventually buy one raptor kind of drone with electronic eyes quite soon.

Overall, living in Dubai is an expensive proposition but then residents save on income and other taxes though paying higher prices for consumer items. Interesting, isn’t it? More news on Dubai soon, it is a place worth visiting for all. Abu Dhabi should not be forgotten either, it seems to be more organized and apparently has more wealth than Dubai itself.

Welcome to more expenses as you travel the world!!!

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

3rd December 2016

Torture the Tourists and Travellers


That’s exactly what happened at Chennai International Airport last evening.

Unbelievable, right?

What I am referring to here is the closure of the three entrance doors of the international airport side, keeping only one door open for ALL travellers, which resulted in long, serpentine queues outside the main doors all the way down along the main corridor wherein travellers disembark from their taxis and cars.

First of all, I saw many irritated folks (that includes me, of course), who could not find a trolley to load their baggages. There is no trolley point at the point(s) at which travellers disembark from their vehicles. All the trolleys are dragged to the points just outside one of the main doors, which forces people to wade through huge crowds in search of trolleys. What a dysfunctional idea is it to park all the trolleys away from points where they are sorely needed? I had to wade through the crowds, first to my right where I could not locate any trolleys and then to my left where I saw trolleys parked some 200 feet away but I could not reach those trolleys as there was a long line of folks trying to get into the only door which was open! However, I did wade through and reached the trolley line, and managed to get two trolleys and then had the unenviable task of climbing over people and cutting across lines to get to my baggages (I luckily had another traveller taking care of my belongings). This was ridiculous, no international airport has such a mess going on at the peak time for international travellers. I was already profusely sweating by the time I managed to bring the trolleys for loading of baggages. Chennai is not for anti-humidity and anti-heat folks.

The most annoying thing however, was the long queue (usually there will be at least 3 doors operating for different airlines) and the quick adaptation of the Indian Q-Theory which I have written about in the past. This theory predicates that if there is one feet of space between two people on a Q, then you can rest assured the gap will quickly covered by a suddenly appearing person who grabs that space, or that space will be used as a “bridge” for people crossing from one side to the other. This theory also advises folks to take care of their nostrils because of the pungent smells which hit one from folks all over in a sweaty weather. This theory then goes on to predicate that people like to rub each other with complete lack of sensitivity in India while existing on a Q, and when it suits them they ignore the presence of people in the front by smashing their trolleys into the inviting legs in front of them as they decide it would be a good resting point for their trolley. And so on, and so forth.

It took me more than 40 minutes to just get through the outside Q, before I reached the only open main door to the airport terminal. Now I was sweating badly, and saw an intruder trying to cut me just at the entry point from nowhere. I threw him away by strong and loud questioning as that is the only way to put some sense into such idiots – they get scared and move away (they must be thinking “what a moron – what is there – I am just one single guy trying to jump into the Q”).

Once inside the terminal, there was a small Q at the airline counter, which I tackled in about 10 minutes. Armed with the boarding pass, I then turned my attention to the immigration Q, and was appalled to see a very, very long Q spilling out of the immigration area by a mile. This was just hugely ridiculous. How do other airports even within India handle crowds? Mumbai and New Delhi stand as prime example on how queues are managed effectively, even with an operating Indian Q Theory. But Chennai International Airport has failed its passengers completely, it is a dysfunctional airport with new buildings which do not make sense. One previous time I saw the new terminal building leaking in pouring rains and puddles of water all over inside the terminal.

Chennai is as close to my home town as any city can be, and it is shameful that the authorities could not manage such an important international airport effectively. Almost everyone I talked to complained or put the blame on one government agency or the other. Unless there is shame which is deeply felt, unless the government ministers and officials are forced to go through the mess like an ordinary passenger, the situation on the ground is not going to change.

What a pity? Why would tourists choose Chennai over the other cities? When is this situation going to change for the better?

No answers yet. Hope is still there.

Cheers,

Vijay Srinivasan

12th September 2016